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Dale W. Lee
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(808) 792-3910
(808) 341-1399
dalelee@
bhhshawaii.com

HI Lic # RS-78629
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EXCERPTS FROM "IMPOSED WISDOM" - Fall 2012-Spring 2013-Summer 2013 

Excerpts from Journal Responses which were sent in reply to Journals submitted by University of Hawai‘i School of Law students serving academic Externships in various venues in and about Hawai‘i, and elsewhere are included hereinbelow. They are segregated into academic years: Fall-Spring-Summer for each Semester that I served as Director of the Externship Program. All Journal Responses are anonymous and harvested from my book, "Imposed Wisdom." Just for fun, check it out.  You'll get a pretty accurate picture of who I am, what I value and treasure about my years at Richardson and which carry on into the future.  " ... that's Dale."

Below, ten Teasers from the Fall 2012-Spring 2013-Summer 2013 Semesters. To see ALL of the Journal Response excerpts (they are all there), HIGHLIGHT the below link and press "Go to: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_80dwkOGDrXMzl2aXB3NXJadm8/view?usp=sharing"

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_80dwkOGDrXMzl2aXB3NXJadm8/view?usp=sharing

You remind me how much I loved being in the Courtroom and interacting with everyone - Judge, lawyers, litigants, staff - you conclude: "interesting stuff."  True, true, and as you progress over the course of your career, it gets better, easier, more comfortable, and remains interesting and in turn you become more effective, more satisfied - more - everything.  Maybe I have you revved up now - but it's truly something to look forward to.

Hooray! And congratulations.  Just one of many "firsts," and the next one will be when your name goes on the pleadings and your signature is on the signature line.  Frame that one.  There'll be only ONE like it. What you will want is that when you have signed and filed the 6,873rd one, you'll have that same sense of excitement.  Go for it.

We often say it’s important to have the litigation side in your background so you can appreciate the subsequent consequences in the event something doesn't go quite according to plan (and that happens a lot, even when you have done everything right). Good to see the work that you want to do, from both sides.

Your Journal is the kind of reflection that we anticipate and desire for our Externs - awakening, empowering and confidence building.  Yes, indeed, you do have something to say, and yes, indeed, there's great luster and shine that carries you - where ever you go, where ever you have been and now, looking forward, whatever your endeavors may be.  Now, inspired, be an inspiration to others as you journey down your own path.  It's contagious!

Anxiety is appropriate and natural, and ___ is a natural at making people feel comfortable - it's called "a lawyer's bedside manner (not only doctor's need it).  It may well be in part, experience as a former Prosecutor that helps to establish  "manner" - one might think just the opposite, that is, a Prosecuting Attorney should be stern and cold, but the truth is that everyone gathers their own style and makes it work for them.  You'll establish a style and manner for yourself as well - and will hone it for the remainder of your career.

Especially impacting: your observation that it cost someone/some company a truckload of attorneys' fees to have a poorly crafted Writ prepared and presented.  And, that the client believes he/she/it has a fighting chance.  Even worse: if there is merit that should be addressed, but it's not adequately communicated - do you "fill-in" the missing pieces?  I think not.

There's a delicate balance between the financial aspects of the law and the "heart and soul" needs of those who practice it.  When they converge at a nice medium point, it's a symphony. "Life is good" means exactly what it says. There's the reward and the satisfaction that we want to have.  Truth be told, NOT always do the two converge and meet at the same time, and sometimes they separate and remain apart for periods of time - when that happens that makes for the darker days of the profession.

Imagine: You are preparing testimony on an issue of extreme importance to our State and doing so at the ground floor, for a real purpose and with a real interest and passion for what you are doing.  Doesn't get much better than that.  Real people, real problems, real solutions, real consequences.  Externship - right on.

You are in a rare venue - and you will learn a great deal - more than you can imagine.  At the introductory level, you are helping some generally good people with generally manageable offenses.  When you move into a more advanced arena, the people that you will represent will not always be people that you will consider "good," and their actions will be distasteful. But they will be entitled to your best efforts in representing them because that's the strength of our system of justice.

Lawyers are like doctors? I like the analogy.  From the other side of the equation, I often talk about lawyers developing a "bedside manner."  Communicating with client/patient - so they are fully informed and know what's happening - when will it hurt, when will it pass, why are things being done.  All designed and intended to impart information at a time that there is much uncertainty, lack of familiarity and anxiety.  When you can develop that style and manner, it’s a true service.