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Dale W. Lee
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(808) 792-3910
(808) 341-1399
dalelee@
bhhshawaii.com

HI Lic # RS-78629
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EXCERPTS FROM "IMPOSED WISDOM" - Fall 2014-Spring 2015-Summer 2015 

Excerpts from Journal Responses which were sent in reply to Journals submitted by University of Hawai‘i School of Law students serving academic Externships in various venues in and about Hawai‘i, and elsewhere are included hereinbelow. They are segregated into academic years: Fall-Spring-Summer for each Semester that I served as Director of the Externship Program.  To see if a Journal response that I sent to YOU is included, HIGHLIGHT the link and click on go to https:

All Journal Responses are anonymous and harvested from my book, "Imposed Wisdom." Just for fun, check it out.  You'll get a pretty accurate picture of who I am, what I value and treasure about my years at Richardson and which carry on into the future.  " ... that's Dale."

Below, ten Teasers from the Fall 2014-Spring 2015-Summer 2015 Semesters. To see ALL of the Journal Response excerpts (they are all there), HIGHLIGHT the below link and press "Go to https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_80dwkOGDrXV0g2bUoxVjBEbTQ/view?usp=sharing" 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_80dwkOGDrXV0g2bUoxVjBEbTQ/view?usp=sharing

Now you know why lawyers - good, conscientious ones - work so freaking hard and long. You are establishing a good work ethic.  That's a positive.  But, you do note quite correctly that the pursuit of perfection is elusive - don't let that pull you down and start becoming a negative.  True, we should all strive for perfection - laudable goal, but not to forget, we are human - and imperfect beings, by design.

Thank you for this very thoughtful, candid Journal.  All is confidential, be assured.  I am touched by your candid and searching reflection - and your articulation that your life post-law school might not be in an appellate setting.  Absolutely nothing wrong with that, in fact, courageous and important for you to be able to say it, much less think it.  What is critical is that you have expressed it.  That's the true nature and benefit of a Journal, and you have struck the heart of the issue.  In the process, you have also provided yourself with a few thinking, talking and doing points for yourself and your career - wherever it takes you.  I can tell you that an appellate venue is not where I would find my peace - I'm just not that comfortable with the setting that you have aptly described.  So, I hear you, appreciate what you have said, and want you to have a learning experience that will be useful to you in the future.  This might be a more difficult trek, but you are in it, you don't regret it, and now the challenge is to make it work for you.  'Can be done.

Parking hassles? Hey, welcome to the BIG CITY!  I know, I know, Big Island style "mo easy." Just park and go!  Here, ho boy, go around and around and around.  Phew.  Imagine if you were in New York City or Chicago! Exhaustion.

You are in an Externship that will promises to be a tremendous learning experience and, as you have already correctly noted, a good foundation to learning and practicing real advocacy, where personal opinions will not always line up with that of the client that relies upon you to put its/his/her or their best foot forward.

"Aha?" Indeed, we all look for it, but at the level at which you are now toiling, I dare say you will look in vain for the "Aha!" case since the Appellate Court below will have already found it and disposed of the matter based upon it.  Nomenclature, maybe, but in my humble opinion, being NOT an appellate type or one that enjoyed research and writing: maybe direct yourself to look for the "Hmmm..." case.  Especially as you are doing Writs, it has always been my uneducated impression that it is when you can get the Court to say "Hmmm..." that you've got a chance.

YAY!  Sounds very much that you are on your way, and experiencing the Externship that you (and I) envisioned, intended, and deserve.  Really happy for you.

Lawyering is marked by versatility. Indeed, 'good to see all angles of the law.  Advocacy and decision-making - they are seemingly at opposite ends of the spectrum, but when you think about it, effective advocacy is very much like decision-making: You set out the pros and the cons and note why the pros outweigh the cons.  Frankly, that's just what decision-makers (judges) do.

Put on one hat (Prosecution) and now put on another (Defense).  You can, and should be able to do both - interchangeably - that's Advocacy.

A great service to one's clients is going the extra mile to explain the processes - the terminology, what to expect, why certain things are done, what the next steps will be - and more.  When one educates and explains a process that is foreign, intimidating and frightening to clients who are thrust into a world that they do not know, and which will impact their lives and futures - one is a true professional.

Appellate Summary Judgment? What the heck? Where did THAT lawyer go to Law School, anyways?  HAHVAHD?  Heh, heh.
  

"that's Dale."